Nevada (NV)

Division of Welfare and Supportive Services (DWSS)

  • In State: 1-800-992-0900
  • Northern: 1-775-684-7200
  • Southern: 1-702-4861646
  • Email: cse@dwss.nv.gov

Website

Address

Clark County Child Support Division

1900 E Flamingo Rd #100

Las Vegas, NV 89119

About Child Support In Nevada

The Child Support Enforcement Program was established in 1975 as Title IV, Part D of the Social Security Act. The program is a federal, state and local intergovernmental collaboration functioning in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands. The Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) assists states develop, manage and operate child support programs effectively and according to federal laws by providing financial and technical assistance.

Child Support Enforcement is a family-first program intended to ensure families self-sufficiency by making child support a more reliable source of income. The program goals are to ensure children have the financial and medical support of both their parents; to foster responsible behavior towards children; to emphasize children need to have both parents involved in their lives; and, to reduce welfare costs.

The purpose and mission of the Child Support Enforcement Program is to enhance the well-being of children by assuring that assistance in obtaining support, including financial and medical, is available to children through locating parents, establishing paternity, establishing support obligations, and monitoring and enforcing those obligations.

When Does Child Support End In Nevada?

In Nevada, child support ends at the age of majority, which is 18, or 19 if a child is in high school and expects to graduate by age 19. Child support is automatically terminated at the age of majority unless otherwise specified in the court order.

Presumptive Maximum Amounts (July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019)

The presumptive maximums (meaning, the law assumes that a parent does not need to pay more than a set, maximum amount per child unless proven differently) limit the amount of support as follows:

Gross Monthly Income At Least
But Not More Than
Presumed Maximum Amount
$0
$4,235
$711
$4,235
$6,351
$781
$6,351
$8,467
$855
$8,467
$10,585
$924
$10,585
$12,701
$995
$12,701
$14,816
$1,065
$14,816
No Limit
$1,138
The Top 6 Fastest Ways To Reduce Your Child Support


Disclaimer: Any and all information appearing on this site is for educational purposes only and should not be considered as legal advice. Please consult an attorney to verify any and all claims made on this site.

Suggested For You

  • Indiana (IN)Indiana (IN) Indiana Department of Child Services Kidsline: 1-800-840-8757 or 1-317-233-5437 Email: ChildSupportInquirie.FSSA@fssa.IN.gov Website […]
  • Alaska (AK)Alaska (AK) Child Support Services Division Phone: 1-907-269-6900 Fax: 1-907-787-3220 KIDSLINE: 1-907-269-6900 KIDSLINE Toll Free: 1-800-478-3300 TTY/TDD: 1-907-269-6894 TTY/TDD […]
  • California (CA)California (CA) Department of Child Support Services (DCSS) Phone: 1-866-901-3212 Email: http://www.childsup.ca.gov/payments/customerconnect.aspx (login required) California Child […]
  • Idaho (ID)Idaho (ID) Child Support Services Phone: 1-800-356-9868 Website http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Children/ChildSupportServices About Child Support In Idaho Our mission is to promote […]
  • After School ActivitiesAfter School Activities Some states will credit your portion of your child's extracurricular (after school) activities toward your child support payments. The list of allowable activities and deductions varies […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *